7 Best Soccer Cleats For Kids

There might not be much necessary equipment for young kids getting started with soccer, but a good pair of cleats can make a big difference.

Not only do they enhance how a player plays, but it gives them the stability they need to feel confident as well. What are the best soccer cleats for kids right now? These options below are a great starting point.


1. Nike Youth Phantom Venom Academy

Players wanting a great overall cleat that might be the best of the best on the market right now should look no further than the Nike Youth Phantom Venom Academy. It looks and feels exactly like what the professionals wear, and with some slight changes, that is exactly what is brought to the table.

Made of synthetic materials to keep things as light as possible, players can enjoy NikeSkin for touch and a unique lacing system to keep the foot locked down.

They are super expensive, but they are on the slightly higher side as far as price is concerned. The good news is that they are very durable and look great after quite a few matches. Kids can be very rough on cleats, but these hold up well.

Pros

  • Flashy design and colors
  • NikeSkin coating works well
  • Lacing system provides a very secure fit

Cons

  • Cleats can feel a little weird until they are fully broken in
  • Not all kids like the hard part of the heel support

2. Adidas Predator Mutator 20.1

Kids are going to either love or hate the design of the Adidas Predator Mutator 20.1. It is a cleat that is definitely eye-catching, and it has plenty of technology on it to make it one of the best in the business. However, a player does need to be comfortable wearing a cleat that rises a little bit up, and the extra weight might be a bit of a hindrance as well.

Younger players just starting out might not need something that is so advanced. However, kids looking to really take their game up to another level can utilize features such as the DemonSkin for extra touch, or the sock-like fit near the ankle.

Are these the best of the best? Parents need to pay a decent amount of money for a pair of these, but they do perform as expected. Players get a chance to really hone their skills, and it is much like a more advanced cleat will be for them in the future.

Pros

  • DemonSkin works well
  • Works for many different surfaces
  • Ankle sleeve is very comfortable

Cons

  • Takes a little bit of time to break and just write
  • Expensive

3. Adidas Nemeziz 18.4

It is pretty common to see professional soccer players wear the Adidas Nemeziz. Even though the kid version is a takedown model, it is an affordable option for parents who want to put their kids in a quality cleat as they are just starting. It might not have all the bells and whistles of the premium option, but it still protects the foot and allows players to learn the game without as much fear of injury.

The first time a kid puts on these cleats, they will notice that they are pretty lightweight. The fit takes a little bit of breaking in to really take advantage, but once that happens, there is a great amount of feel and touch with the ball. Even though all the materials on the shoe are synthetic, it feels very solid and protective so that younger players do not get hurt.

The fit is a little bit tricky for any kids who have wide feet, but other than that, they should be good to go. Players who might fear that they are going to overheat a bit because of the warm weather will also love the fact that there is plenty of ventilation with these shoes.

They may not be the exact model that are worn by pros, but kids are still going to love the way they stand out in the crowd.

Pros

  • Comes in many different colors
  • Provides great feel for dribbling and shooting
  • Very lightweight

Cons

  • Fit is a little bit narrow
  • Might not be flexible enough for more advanced kid players

4. Adidas Copa 19.3

As a very popular option for adults, the Adidas Copa 19.3 comes in a kid version as well. Players can feel and look like a professional player when they wear these, and it allows players to develop great touch with the ball overall.

Anyone who loves that feel of soft leather on the outer part of the shoe will love what the Copa 19.3 brings to the table. It is a very comfortable option that hugs the foot right out of the box, and then gets better and better as time goes on.

There are definitely lighter soccer cleats out there, but sometimes, younger players need protection and quality build over being as lightweight as possible. Plenty of technology goes into the shoe, but it still stays at a pretty fair price point.

Pros

  • Fits well out of the box
  • Continues to hug the foot
  • Works for all positions

Cons

  • Somewhat bulky
  • More expensive options have better technology

5. Adidas Goletto VI

A very thin profile cleat made for all types of younger players, these are a great option for parents trying to stay on budget. With sizing the covers any player age 1 through 12, it is clear they can be purchased again and again if a player seems to like it.

There is nothing too crazy about the shoe in general, but they do hold up long enough for at least one season. Sizing can be a little troublesome when shopping online, but the shoe does a decent job molding to a players foot as well.

It is one of the few cleats out there that are very accommodating for wider feet as well. This offers a more sturdy and wide fit that can make players more confident, and parents feel safer.

Pros

  • Wide size range
  • Lightweight for the price
  • Available in a few different colors

Cons

  • Sizing is a bit weird
  • Protection is not the best

6. Joma Toledo Jr

This shoe option from Joma is without question a fan favorite. Even though it might not be the most well-known brand worldwide, there are parts of the world where Joma is very popular. It is perfect for players learning, as they are very durable and made of quality materials overall.

Available in a design that works on both natural grass and artificial turf, the studs are low profile enough the players have plenty of stability.

It is a very lightweight shoe that is breathable as well, so younger players never feel like they are overwhelmed with heat while they are playing a match. That is sometimes not given enough focus on younger shoes, but it helps keep these very lightweight for the player still learning the game.

Pros

  • Works on many different surfaces
  • High quality materials across-the-board
  • Does a great job absorbing impact

Cons

  • Hard to find at times in stock
  • Low profile studs might not work in muddy conditions

7. Diadora Cattura Junior Soccer Shoes

Diadora offers this cleat in a number of fun colors that can really capture the attention of younger players. With a very soft polyurethane upper and a strong upper, younger players can feel very confident with these cleats on at all times during the match.

Parents can really enjoy saving money with these junior cleats. They only go up to a certain size, which makes it a little disappointing for kids who really love the fit. Fortunately, Diadora offers several other options for kids once they start to outgrow the junior line.

Pros

  • Inexpensive
  • Multiple colors
  • Strong upper

Cons

  • Only available in smaller sizes for kids
  • Limited online availability

What To Look For With Soccer Cleats For Kids

Before opening up the wallet and spending money on soccer cleats, do the proper amount of research and understand the basics of shopping for kids. While a lot of the same rules apply to cleats that do for regular shoes, the last thing any parent should do is frivolously spend on shoes without doing their homework.

Proper Size

Soccer kids are constantly growing out of shoes, so make sure to get a pair that is perfectly sized for right now. Yes, it might be pretty frustrating to learn later on that they can only last for one season, but that is the same issue every parent faces with their child who is in the middle of a growth spurt.

Save all soccer shoes for the next kid, or sell them as used to make some of the money back. As long as a kid get a pair relatively close to their size currently, it will start to mold to their feet.

Material

There are different types of material that are used to make a soccer cleat. Upper parts of a soccer shoe can include leather, synthetic materials, mesh, or a knit.

Lightweight options generally help the majority of players, but leather is going to be more durable. It is also a softer material that comes at a bit of a premium, but it allows players to feel much more comfortable in their cleats throughout the match.

Can kids take care of leather cleats? They might not last quite as long with kids always getting into something during (and after) matches, but they are still worth investing in for that added touch and feel. However, the modern game is moving towards synthetic materials, so it ultimately comes down to going off feedback from the child.

Surface

It is very important to figure out what surface a kid is going to play on the majority of the time. If the league is played on turf, every player needs to have turf soccer cleats. The same rules apply for other surfaces.

While there can be a little bit of crossover here in there, leagues might require players to wear proper studs so that the field is not messed up in any way. The last thing a parent wants is to buy a brand new pair of cleats, only for them to sit on the shelf all season long.

You can read more about the differences between the surfaces in this post.

Position

It does not matter as much with kids shoes, but shopping for a position should matter to some extent. Strikers need to have a lot of speed on the pitch, so they usually opt for lighter cleats.

Goalkeepers want to have excellent traction, and a good amount of protection as well. Their cleats might weigh a little more, but it is worth it to stay protected.

For position specific soccer cleats, check out one of these posts:

Since kids switch positions regularly, an all-around cleat is the best way to start. As they start to settle into a position, that is when more specific cleats make a difference.

Connor Smith

I'm Connor, the guy behind SoccerPrime. I'm a former NCAA Div 1 college player that retired at the age of 21 due to injuries - which led me into a new career as a soccer coach.

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