7 Best Training Soccer Balls

In order to become great at soccer, a lot of training is necessary. More often than not, having multiple soccer balls to train with can be beneficial as well. The problem is that spending hundreds of dollars on a ball to train with can get expensive in a hurry.

These are the best training soccer balls for players on somewhat of a budget, but still want something of high quality. They will get the job done as far as working on skill and building muscle memory is concerned, but they probably aren’t going to be used for matches all that often.

1. Select Numero 10

The Select Numero 10 soccer ball has been a pretty dependable option for players of all ages for quite a while. They offer balls for different surfaces, and they also come in different colors so that players can get exactly what they are hoping for.

Made of durable covers and ready to handle all types of weather conditions, the balls are inexpensive enough to be trainers for most players.

Despite making this training ball list, they are approved for NFHS and NCAA play. They are usually not used in the situation, as there are better options out there, but it shows just how realistic it feels for a trainer.

If there is a knock on this ball, it is that the panels don’t seem to stay together particularly well after heavy use. They are not expensive enough that it shouldn’t matter all the time, but it’s one thing to keep in mind when shopping around.

Pros

  • Feels like a real match ball
  • Numerous color choices and sizes
  • Dependable company

Cons

  • Stitching comes undone a little too easily
  • On the more expensive side for training balls

2. Puma FluoCat training ball

Puma makes very durable soccer balls across the board, so it’s no surprise that the training ball also comes through. It’s a pretty basic-looking ball with just a solid color and the Puma logo on it, but most are not looking for something too crazy or flashy when they are training.

The machine stitching on the ball makes everything feel slightly softer, almost to the point that it feels like a match ball. The ball reacts very similarly in the air as well, so people training can really get a feel for what works for them.

There’s nothing too crazy about the training ball, but it’s reliable and has a ton of positive reviews from real users.

Pros

  • Different colors to choose from
  • Ball is easy to control
  • Keeps air in well

Cons

  • Shows a lot of wear and tear during the most intense practices
  • Some balls shipped out have lackluster stitching

3. Adidas MLS Top Glider

Versatile and inexpensive, the Adidas MLS Top Glider is always a best seller. It looks and even feels like a performance ball used in matches, but the training ball is only a fraction of the price. It has a TPU cover that has plenty of durability added to the mix, and those balls hold up well under a lot of practice.

Available in multiple sizes, players of all ages can start to learn how to train the right way and stay sharp with all their skills.

It’s not meant to ever perform well in an actual match, but it gets the job done for training. A lot of people will actually invest in a few of these balls at once so that they have a lot to their disposal.

Pros

  • Durable
  • Very soft fuel
  • Excellent air retention

Cons

  • Doesn’t do well as an actual match ball
  • Some of the top color designs sell out quickly

4. Adidas miCoach Smart Ball

For a little bit of an extra price, the Adidas miCoach Smart Ball is perfect for people who want to look at things a little more in a little bit. It has everything built in to measure power, spin, trajectory, and so much more with ease.

It works because there is a Bluetooth sensor inside that talks with a program on Apple and Android phones. Not only can people check out all the data afterwards, but it gives tips on how to improve based on that data. In essence, it’s truly a coach within a ball.

The ball performance is solid as well, although it’s not going to be the same level as an actual match ball. That’s to be expected, but what a lot of people wonder is just how durable it is.

While investing in this, the ball must be durable enough that it will last for a while. That’s exactly the case, and matches up very nicely with the other Adidas training balls on this list. People are making the extra investment for the data, and it’s 100% worth it for some.

Pros

  • Excellent way to measure improvement
  • Seamless bonding panels
  • Holds charge well

Cons

  • Expensive
  • Can be frustrating when it starts to wear out

5. Adidas MLS Top Training Ball

The third Adidas ball to make this list is the Adidas MLS Top Training option. It is a high-quality practice ball that’s a little more expensive, but worth it for people who want something very close to a match ball. Instead of stitching on the panels, everything is thoroughly bonded to give that pro performance feel.

Not only does it feel better, but it has a stronger build to it that fights off water and keeps air in. That means less maintenance with the ball to keep it working as it should.

Players who mess around with it consistently with practice love the control and trajectory they can get with the ball. It might just be the best overall training ball out there right now, as Adidas understands that players of all ages need something besides just game options.

Pros

  • Performs well in the air
  • Perfect touch
  • Holds air well

Cons

  • Only suitable for grass or turf surfaces
  • Lighter colors show dirt easy

6. One World Soccer Ball

For a company to say that their ball is indestructible, it must be an extremely durable solution. That’s exactly what people are going to get with a One World Soccer ball, although a little bit different from the other training balls on this list.

It doesn’t look like a typical soccer ball, as it is slightly heavier than match options. Some people don’t care about training with a different weighted ball, as it actually helps with building some strength. However, others feel like they lose a little bit of their touch by using a ball that feels so different.

This ball is made entirely of a special type of foam that always keeps it playable and ready to go. It’s also durable enough that it can be used on grass fields, or in the streets.

Goalkeepers will sometimes use this as a great way to train, since they don’t have to worry so much about the feel of the ball itself. As for field players, they might need to go with something else, but it’s worth investing in one to see how it feels.

Pros

  • Never runs out of air
  • Usable on any type of surface
  • Indestructible

Cons

  • Doesn’t feel or perform exactly like a competition soccer ball
  • Expensive

7. Mikasa Serious Soccer Ball

There are a few soccer balls from Mikasa on the market, but this is the best for training. It has a very comfortable, softer build that a lot of people like, but it helps people get to where they want to be as a player by practicing hard.

The first thing one will notice with the outer part of the ball is that it has very long-lasting stitching. There is a two-ply butyl bladder that helps with the best air retention on the market. With soft composite coverage all around, the ball feels very soft with touch as well.

The Serious ball works for all ages, but it’s especially good for younger players who might not want that hard feel found with adult balls. It’s very affordable and worth it for those looking for a training ball that works for them.

Pros

  • Very durable
  • Soft touch
  • Holds air well

Cons

  • Only works on grass fields
  • Limited size choices

Our Top Pick

While the miCoach ball is intriguing from Adidas, it’s the MLS Training ball that is the best of the best. It’s much more affordable, and it just performs the most like a regular match ball.

Players training with these can really start to feel confident once they take the pitch for real. It’s a bonus that it is cheap enough that people can invest in a few of them and take them out for all types of training.

Connor Smith

I'm Connor, the guy behind SoccerPrime. I'm a former NCAA Div 1 college player that retired at the age of 21 due to injuries - which led me into a new career as a soccer coach.

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